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Summary Judgment

Summary judgment is proper only if there is no genuine issue of material fact and the moving party is entitled to judgment as a matter of law. Tex.R.Civ.P. 166a(c).
The standard for reviewing a motion for summary judgment is as follows:
1. The movant for summary judgment has the burden of showing there is no genuine issue of material fact and it is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.
2. In deciding whether there is a disputed material fact issue precluding summary judgment, evidence favorable to the nonmovant will be taken as true.
3. Every reasonable inference must be indulged in favor of the nonmovant and any doubts resolved in his favor. 690 S.W.2d 546, 548-49 (Tex.1985).

A defendant must disprove one element of the plaintiff's cause of action to prevail on summary judgment. 675 S.W.2d 802, 804 (Tex.App.--Beaumont 1984, writ ref'd n.r.e.). The summary judgment proof must establish as a matter of law that there is no genuine issue of material fact on one or more of the essential elements of the cause of action. 450 S.W.2d 827, 828 (Tex.1970).

When a movant relies on an affirmative defense, it must expressly plead and prove all essential elements of that defense as a matter of law. 669 S.W.2d 309, 310-11 (Tex.1984).

A matter is conclusively established only if ordinary minds cannot differ about the conclusion to be drawn from the evidence. Triton Oil & Gas Corp. v. Marine Contractors & Supply, Inc., 644 S.W.2d 443, 446 (Tex.1982).





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